Archive for the ‘Reigning Pooh-Bah Maximus of Cover Tune’ Category

Tune du Jour: “Paranoid” – Black Sabbath
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Ruder Than You vs. Soft Cell
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Paranoid was released in 1970 on Black Sabbath’s second album, which was also titled Paranoid. The song’s popularity in the US started slowly – reaching only as high as number 61 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 – but built over time as album rock radio stations played it incessantly. On the other hand, the U.K. fell in love with it immediately.  Paranoid reached number four on the U.K. Singles Chart in 1970 and, amazingly, appeared on that same chart again in 1980, breaking into the Top 20. In fact, unlike the U.S., Paranoid was an immediate success throughout Europe and South Africa. 

Broccoli For Miles And Miles And Miles And Miles And Miles ... Oh Yeah!

Broccoli For Miles
And Miles And Miles
And Miles And Miles …
Oh Yeah!

Among Paranoid’s awards:

1976, NME (United Kingdom) ranked it number 41 on their All Time Top 100 Singles list.

1989, Spin (United States) ranked it number 81 on their 100 Greatest Singles of All Time list.

1989, Radio Veronica (Netherlands) ranked it number 16 on their Super All-Time List.

1994, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (United States) named it to their The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list.

1998, Guitarist (United Kingdom) ranked it number 84 on their Top 100 Guitar Solos of All-Time list.

2004, Rolling Stone (United States) ranked it number 250 on their 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

2004, Q (United Kingdom) named it to their 1010 Songs You Must Own! list.

2006, Q ranked it number 100 on their 100 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

2006, VH1 (United States) ranked it number 34 on their 40 Greatest Metal Songs list.

2008, VH1 ranked it number 4 on their 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs list.

Paranoid is generally thought of as Black Sabbath’s crowning achievement. Yet, it almost did not come to be. According to Black Sabbath’s bass player, Geezer Butler:

“A lot of the Paranoid album was written around the time of our first album,Black Sabbath. We recorded the whole thing in about 2 or 3 days, live in the studio. The song Paranoid was written as an afterthought. We basically needed a 3 minute filler for the album, and Tony came up with the riff. I quickly did the lyrics, and Ozzy was reading them as he was singing.”

And that my friends is how you compose a heavy metal anthem! Can you imagine a world without Paranoid?

The Original

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Black Sabbath:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Ruder Than You vs. Soft Cell
Ruder Than You:

Ruder Than You holds the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of “Paranoid”. Additionally, Ruder Than You is also a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni-Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold orange!

Ruder Than You’s triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

11/6/2013 – “Paranoid” (Black Sabbath) – Ruder Than You (71%) expunge The Dickies (29%)

Soft Cell:

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Have You Ever Seen the Rain” – Creedence Clearwater Revival
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: The Ramones vs. Hi-Standard
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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GREAT SONG! Along with Fortunate Son probably Creedence Clearwater Revival’s two greatest numbers (although I’ve also always had a soft spot for Someday Never Comes and Long as I Can See the Light as well). Have You Ever Seen the Rain  was written by John Fogerty and released as a single in 1971. It had originally appeared on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s album Pendulum, released in 1970. The song charted highest in Canada, reaching number one on the RPM 100 national album chart in March 1971. In the US, it peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. And it reached number 36 on the UK’s Pop Singles Chart.

I'm Hooked On The Ceiling I'm High On Believing That You're In Love With Me

It Ain’t Me
I’m Broccoli
I Ain’t No Fortunate One!

Given the polarizing and contentious time in which Have You Ever Seen The Rain was written there has been much speculation as to the true meaning of the song. At the time the US was entangled in a seemingly endless unpopular war and the nation was struggling to make sense of the Kent State shootings. Not surprisingly, most music critics attributed the lyrics to the political and social turmoil of the day. Writing about the song, Have You Ever Seen The Rain, Mark Denning of AllMusic surmised:

“In 1970, a time when the giddy possibilities of political and social change of the late ’60s had been put in check by the sobering realities of Altamont and Kent State and both rock & roll and the youth culture at large were beginning to move away from idealism and into the self-centered decadence of the ’70s, Fogerty was one of the few songwriters grounded enough to suggest the issues had not gone away, but that we had lost the courage and the vision to face up to them.”

Yet, interestingly, Fogerty has stated on more than one occasion that the song had nothing to do with political and societal issues. He contends that it was his lament of the turmoil taking place within the band, Creedence Clearwater Revival. At the time, despite having achieved fame and fortune, the members of the band were in a state of constant conflict with each other. It was particularly upsetting that his brother, Tom, was so dissatisfied that Fogerty felt sure he would soon leave the band. Fogerty’s perception turned out to be accurate. Not only did Tom leave, but the whole band split up the following year.

The Original

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Credence Clearwater Revival:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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The Ramones vs. Hi-Standard

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The Ramones:

The Ramones hold the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of “Have You Ever Seen The Rain“. Additionally, The Ramones are also a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni-Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold gold!

The Ramones’ triumphal exploits in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competitions are detailed below:

1/30/2014 – “Have You Ever Seen Rain” (Creedence Clearwater Revival) – Ramones (80%) wallop Minutemen (20%)

Hi-Standard:

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Laugh At Me” – Sonny Bono
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Mott the Hoople vs Pete Stride and John Plain
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Everybody's Dressin' Funny ... Cover Me Impressed!

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny …
Cover Me Impressed!

Laugh At Me, released as single in 1965, was Sonny Bono’s only hit as a solo artist. The song  reached number #10 in the U.S. on the Billboard Hot 100 and number #9 in the United Kingdom on the Pop Singles Chart. Laugh At Me reached #1 in Canada on the RPM national singles chart, ironically to eventually be overtaken by Sonny & Cher’s Baby Don’t Go.

Sonny wrote Laugh At Me in angst after being refused service at a Los Angeles restaurant for wearing what the owner considered to be “hippie attire”. He was not happy about it!

Sonny has often been the butt of jokes, many times deservedly so, yet the guy actually had some talent and could write a decent song every now and then. I would submit that this is one of them.

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The Original

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Sonny Bono:

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This is an alternate version. The sound quality is not nearly as good but it’s worth checking out just to see the controlled rage Sonny seems to be in as he belts out the lyrics.

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Mott the Hoople vs Pete Stride and John Plain
Mott the Hoople:

Mott the Hoople holds the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of Laugh At Me. Additionally, Mott the Hoople is also a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni-Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold gold!

Mott the Hoople’s triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

11/17/2013 – “Laugh At Me” (Sonny Bono) – Mott the Hoople (93%) thrash Otis Ball (7%)

You don’t suppose Ian Hunter could have related to these lyrics, possibly turning a few heads every now and then with his look? He obviously really dug the song though. He recorded it with his band, Mott the Hoople, and again during his solo career.  And he must have played it live a lot. Laugh At Me appears on no less than five Mott the Hoople/Ian Hunter live albums.

Pete Stride and John Plain:

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Love Song” – The Damned
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Melt-Banana vs. The London Punkharmonic Orchestra
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Oh No! There Ain't No Broccoli Sauce...

Oh No!
There Ain’t No Broccoli Sauce…

Love Song by The Damned was first released as a single in April 1979 and appeared again in December 1979 on the band’s third and much ballyhooed release, Machine Gun EtiquetteLove Song was The Damned’s first hit, reaching number 20 on the UK Singles chart and earning the band a coveted appearance on Top of the Pops.

The Original

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The Damned:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Melt-Banana vs. The London Punkharmonic Orchestra
Melt-Banana:

The London Punkharmonic Orchestra:

The London Punkharmonic Orchestra hold the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of “Love Song“. Additionally, The London Punkharmonic Orchestra is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold gold!

The London Punkharmonic Orchestra’s triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

10/15/2013 – “Love Song” (The Damned) – The London Punkharmonic Orchestra (60%) edge Red Letter Day (40%)

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Dancing Queen” – ABBA
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Milo Binder vs. Glow
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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And In My Hour of Need, I Truly Am Indeed, Alone Again, Broccoli ...

And In My Hour of Need,
I Truly Am Indeed,
Alone Again, Broccoli …

Dancing Queen was released by ABBA in August 1976. It is commonly referred to as one of the most successful singles of the 1970s. Dancing Queen became a massive worldwide hit, topping the charts in more than a dozen countries including ABBA’s native Sweden (where it spent 14 weeks at the top), Australia, Belgium, Brazil, West Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Mexico,the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway (where it charted for 32 weeks), making it the 11th best-performing single of all time in that country), South Africa and Rhodesia. Dancing Queen also topped the charts in the United States, ABBA’s only #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was a Top 5 hit in Austria, Canada, Finland, France and Switzerland. The song sold over three million copies. And yet, it is still remarkably atrocious. Or, to put it more technically, it is unequivocally an “auditive malady”.

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The Original

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ABBA:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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As alluded to above, despite the substantial acclaim achieved and accolades bestowed upon it, this is truly an abysmal song, the quintessential auditive malady. The 1970s probably produced the worst body of music in the last century and very possibly the entire history of the planet. And Dancing Queen certainly is exemplary in epitomizing all that was wrong with the 70s music scene; perfectly straight pearly white teeth centering witless, blissful, smiley faced “musicians” donning polyester, pastel leisure suits while assaulting the listening public with insipid lyrics that convey vapid bubble-gum bromides, which were required for the era’s pretentious dance gyrations and subsequent vacuous mating rituals. Songs of this era are easily mocked and lampooned.

Yet, despite covering a dead-weight anchor of a song, the offerings below are quite frankly brilliant, in that they manage to make this disaster (aka Dancing Queen)  actually enjoyable and, particularly in the case of Milo Binder, sound poignant! Skeptical, are you? Well, bang on …

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Milo Binder vs. Glow
Milo Binder:

Milo Binder holds the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of Dancing Queen. Additionally, Milo Binder is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold yellow!

Milo Binder’s triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

1/3/2014 – “Dancing Queen” (ABBA) – Milo Binder  (84%) thumps Robbie Fulks (16%)

Glow:

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Burning Love” – Elvis Presley
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Kingsized vs. The Residents
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Why Can't You See, I'm Just A Stalk of Broccoli Incapable of Cheatin' On You, Baby...

Why Can’t You See,
I’m Just A Stalk of Broccoli,
Incapable of Cheatin’ On You, Baby…

Burning Love was written by Dennis Linde and first released by Arthur Alexander in 1972. Alexander’s version failed to make many waves. A few months later, Elvis Presley released his killer cover of Burning Love, which quickly rose to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. Chuck Berry’s My Ding-A-Ling kept Burning Love from reaching #1, thereby proving that the early 70’s just might have been the horniest period in American history. But that’s fodder for another post on a different day.

Burning Love was Elvis’ 40th and last Top Ten hit on the US charts. But if this was going to be his final real rocker then at least he left one of the best for last. I mean, c’mon, how many artists could throw down the line “I’m just a hunk-a, hunk-a burnin’ love” and pull it off with aplomb? Let’s just say you could maybe count them up on one hand after a major industrial accident, if you know what I mean…and I think you do!

The brilliance of Burnin’ Love is that it manages to meld rock with gospel, all the while soaked with raw, passionate desire. As Steve Huey of AllMusic aptly puts it:

Presley gives a supremely passionate performance that rivals his most incendiary ’50s work. The lyrics never depart from the theme of smoldering passion, but the chorus — “Your kisses lift me higher/Like the sweet song of a choir” (which happens to be backing Presley’s vocals) — imparts a gospel-ish transcendence that elevates earthly love into a spiritual experience. There are several occasions where Presley allows the music to carry him away, humming and moaning to keep the feeling going in between lyrics. Yet, while he’s larger than life, he’s never over the top — when you’ve reclaimed your title as the King of rock & roll, there’s nothing to prove, and Presley’s cool (but not complacent) assurance keeps things grounded amidst all the storm and fire. Drummer Ronnie Tutt straddles the two sensibilities well; he knows when to lay back and let the beat swing, but also when to drive the song with explosive bursts in between the vocals, and proves a major supporting player.”

A few tidbits, which may very well be true:

Writer of the song, Dennis Linde, kicks out the opening guitar jam as well as a few other licks throughout Presley’s version of Burning’ Love.

Bruce Springsteen consistently covered the song in his live shows of the late 90’s and early 2000’s.

Burning Love was used as the wake-up song on the 2008 space shuttle mission STS-123.

The Simpsons’ paid homage to the song, titling a 2001 episode “A-Hunka-Hunka Burns in Love“.

Perhaps the single greatest performance of the song was RDubbs‘ legendary and much-revered throw-down a decade or two ago at a Star Bar karaoke night.

 

The Original

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Arthur Alexander:

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The Most Popular

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Elvis Presley:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Kingsized vs. The Residents

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Kingsized:

Kingsized holds the distinction of being CMI’s Reigning Exultant Virtuosic Performer of “Burning Love”. Additionally, Kingsized is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Tri Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold green!

Kingsized’s triumphal exploits in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competitions are detailed below:

11/26/2013 – THE CLASH of the Mini Medleys: Tongo Hiti (75%) – “My Heart Will Go On” (Celine Dion); “Rebel Yell” (Billy Idol); and some God-awful Metalica song (Metalica) vanguish Tiny Tim & The New Duncan Imperials (25%) – “Tennessee Waltz” (Cowboy Copas); “Back in the Saddle” (Gene Autry); and “Your Cheatin’ Heart” (Hank Williams)

11/11/2013 – “Burning Love” (Arthur Alexander) – Kingsized (100%) obliterate Swing Cats (0%)

11/2/2013 – “Pinball Wizard” (The Who) – Mike Geier & the Reverend Horton Heat (88%) trounce Sandy Nelson (12%)

The Residents:

Okay, this one was included solely for the video. Stuff like this just kills me.

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Just My Imagination” – The Tempatations
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Ted Hawkins vs. The Rolling Stones
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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I Shouted Out, "Who Ate The Broccoli?", When After All, It Was You And Me...

I Shouted Out, “Who Ate The Broccoli?”, When After All, It Was You And Me…

Perhaps The Temptations seminal work, Just My Imagination, was released in 1971 on the album Sky’s The Limit. The single was number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for two weeks and number one on the Billboard R&B chart for three weeks. The song ended up being The Temptations’ original members’ last number one hit. Afterwards Eddie Kendricks left the band to pursue a solo career and Paul Williams was forced to retire for health reasons. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine listed Just My Imagination as number 389 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The Original

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The Temptations:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Ted Hawkins vs. The Rolling Stones

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Ted Hawkins:

Ted Hawkins is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold gold!

Ted Hawkins‘ triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

1/20/2014 – “The 59th St. Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy)” (Simon & Garfunkel) – Ted Hawkins (67%) prevails over The Coolies (33%)

The Rolling Stones:

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.