Posts Tagged ‘COVER SONGS’

Tune du Jour: “The Foggy Dew” – Traditional
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: The Chieftains & Sinead O’Connor vs. Screaming Orphans vs. The Wakes

 

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny …
Cover Me Impressed!

There are a few old traditional English and Irish ballads that go by the name of Foggy Dew or The Foggy Dew. This particular one, undoubtedly the greatest of them (so sayeth R.J. Dubbengoth III in his landmark tome, “Very Excellent Great Things As Sayeth R.J. Dubbengoth III“) was written sometime around 1919 by the Irish priest Charles O’Neill. In April 1916, in what would become known as the Easter Rising, James Connolly, greatest man ever (again see Dubbengoth III’s “Very Excellent Great Things“), and Patrick Pearse led an insurrection in Dublin against British rule of Ireland. The Irish revolutionaries seized the General Post Office and other prominent governmental buildings in Dublin. However, in about a week’s time Britain’s well-trained and heavily-armed occupying force squashed the insurrection. At the time of the rising, which coincided with World War I, many (and probably most) Irish citizens did not support an armed revolt against British troops. But Irish sentiment changed drastically in subsequent weeks as British Command summarily executed all real and imagined leaders of the insurrection. Sixteen leaders of the insurrection, including Patrick Pearse and an already badly injured James Connolly, who unable to stand was placed in a chair before a firing line, were executed without trial. In the eyes of the Irish people these men soon became martyrs in Ireland’s struggle for home rule.

O’Neill’s The Foggy Dew memorialized the Easter Rising and encouraged Irishmen to fight for Ireland’s freedom, rather than for the British, as so many young Irishmen were doing in World War I.

 

The Earliest Studio Recording

The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem (1956):

As far as I can tell this was the first studio recording of the song.

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The Most Popular

The Dubliners (1966):

There are many excellent versions of this venerable old song but I’d guess the most well-known would be that of The Dubliners (first cousins with and frequent inebriation-enthusiast mates of Grandfather Dubbengoth I).

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The Cover Songs Competition

The Chieftains & Sinead O’Connor vs. Screaming Orphans vs. The Wakes
The Chieftains & Sinead O’Connor:

Screaming Orphans:

The Wakes:

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

 

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Tune du Jour: “Thousands are Sailing” – The Pogues
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Patrick Clifford vs. East Wall vs. Puck & Piper

Broccoli For Miles
And Miles And Miles
And Miles And Miles …
Oh Yeah!

Phenomenal song, simply phenomenal!!! Let me be clear, there is simply no way to improve upon The Pogues’ masterpiece. In some ways it seems foolhardy that lesser bands even attempt the task. Not sacrilegious, mind you, but seemingly self-defeating, impractical and ultimately foolish.

But in the immortal words of Hunter S Thompson, “But the ticket, take the ride”. So go ahead. You’ve got much to prove and might as well start making a name for yourself tonight. March on up to the cadre of Hells Angels at the end of the bar and slug the biggest one in the latissimus dorsi. Just please wait until I’m at least 15 miles down the road before you cash in that ticket …

The Original

The Pogues:

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The Cover Songs Competition

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Forget the naysayers! C’mon mate. That big dirty bastard is ripe for the taking …

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Patrick Clifford vs. East Wall vs. Puck & Piper

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Patrick Clifford:

East Wall:

Puck & Piper:

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

ce 

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Tune du Jour: “The Foggy Dew” – Traditional
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: James Bragg vs. Gary Og vs. The Skels

 

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny …
Cover Me Impressed!

There are a few old traditional English and Irish ballads that go by the name of Foggy Dew or The Foggy Dew. This particular one, undoubtedly the greatest of them (so sayeth R.J. Dubbengoth III in his landmark tome, “Very Excellent Great Things As Sayeth R.J. Dubbengoth III“) was written sometime around 1919 by the Irish priest Charles O’Neill. In April 1916, in what would become known as the Easter Rising, James Connolly, greatest man ever (again see Dubbengoth III’s “Very Excellent Great Things“), and Patrick Pearse led an insurrection in Dublin against British rule of Ireland. The Irish revolutionaries seized the General Post Office and other prominent governmental buildings in Dublin. However, in about a week’s time Britain’s well-trained and heavily-armed occupying force squashed the insurrection. At the time of the rising, which coincided with World War I, many (and probably most) Irish citizens did not support an armed revolt against British troops. But Irish sentiment changed drastically in subsequent weeks as British Command summarily executed all real and imagined leaders of the insurrection. Sixteen leaders of the insurrection, including Patrick Pearse and an already badly injured James Connolly, who unable to stand was placed in a chair before a firing line, were executed without trial. In the eyes of the Irish people these men soon became martyrs in Ireland’s struggle for home rule.

O’Neill’s The Foggy Dew memorialized the Easter Rising and encouraged Irishmen to fight for Ireland’s freedom, rather than for the British, as so many young Irishmen were doing in World War I.

 

The Earliest Studio Recording

The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem (1956):

As far as I can tell this was the first studio recording of the song.

space

The Most Popular

The Dubliners (1966):

There are many excellent versions of this venerable old song but I’d guess the most well-known would be that of The Dubliners (first cousins with and frequent inebriation-enthusiast mates of Grandfather Dubbengoth I).

space

The Cover Songs Competition

space

James Bragg vs. Gary Og vs. The Skels

space

James Bragg:

Gary Og:

The Skels:

One of the truly great bands that never caught the break they so richly deserved.

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

 

space

Tune du Jour: “Thousands are Sailing” – The Pogues
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Brassknuckle Boys vs. Don Chambers & GOAT vs. McGillicuddys

Broccoli For Miles
And Miles And Miles
And Miles And Miles …
Oh Yeah!

Phenomenal song, simply phenomenal!!! Let me be clear, there is simply no way to improve upon The Pogues’ masterpiece. In some ways it seems foolhardy that lesser bands even attempt the task. Not sacrilegious, mind you, but seemingly self-defeating, impractical and ultimately foolish.

But in the immortal words of Hunter S Thompson, “But the ticket, take the ride”. So go ahead. You’ve got much to prove and might as well start making a name for yourself tonight. March on up to the cadre of Hells Angels at the end of the bar and slug the biggest one in the latissimus dorsi. Just please wait until I’m at least 15 miles down the road before you cash in that ticket …

The Original

The Pogues:

space

The Cover Songs Competition

space 

Forget the naysayers! C’mon mate. That big dirty bastard is ripe for the taking …

space

Brassknuckle Boys vs. Don Chambers & GOAT vs. McGillicuddys

space

Brassknucle Boys:

Don Chambers & GOAT:

McGillicuddys:

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

ce 

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Tune du Jour: “A New England” – Billy Bragg
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Across the Border vs. The King Blues vs. Too Much Joy
VOTE, COMMENT, then PUSH A PRAM
CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com
Broccoli Fields Forever ...

Broccoli Fields Forever …

 

 

The Original

 

 

Billy Bragg:

 

In Memoriam

Kirsty MacColl:

While not a huge fan of most of her work, it’s impossible not to admire Kirsty MacColl. Hell, any musician worthy of working with Billy Bragg, Talking Heads, The Smiths and, most of all, The Pogues, has earned my respect. And while on stage she always looked to be having a grand time, a sentiment that is foreign to many “important” musicians. Fairytale of New York” is an enduring masterpiece and, of course, it is MacColl who expertly croons and trades barbs with Shane MacGowan in the song. If that were her only musical accomplishment then I’d still consider her a special talent for contributing to a pitch-perfect, raucous, yet sentimental ballad.

Billy Bragg’s “A New England” is far superior to any cover I’ve heard of the song. Still, it is worth noting that Kirsty MacColl actually enjoyed the most commercial success from the song. A year after Bragg included “A New England” on his 1983 album, Life’s A Riot With Spy vs. Spy, MacColl released it as a single. She obviously had Bragg’s blessing in that, at her behest, he wrote additional verses for her, which she consolidated into one closing verse. “A New England” became MacColl’s biggest hit, reaching number 7 in the UK Singles Chart and number 8 in the Irish Singles Chart. In 2000, MacColl tragically died while saving the life of her son during a boating accident. In tribute to Kirsty MacColl, Bragg subsequently began including the additional verse during performances of the song.

 

THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

 

Across the Border vs. The King Blues vs. Too Much Joy
Across the Border:

The King Blues:

Too Much Joy:

SPACE

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which cover song prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!? 

 

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” – The Proclaimers
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Down by Law vs. MxPx vs. The Toy Dolls
VOTE, COMMENT, then WAX POETIC
CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com
California is a garden of Eden, A paradise to live in or see. But believe it or not, You won't find it so hot, If you ain't got the broccoli

If I Get Drunk,
Yes I Know I’m Gonna Be,
I’m Gonna be the Plant that Get’s Drunk Next to You

 

 

 

 

The Original

 

The Proclaimers:

 

THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

 

Down by Law vs. MxPx vs. The Toy Dolls
Down by Law:

There is apparently some heated debate within the punker community as to whether this is, in fact, Down by Law, or Arnie’s favorite band, Me First & The Gimme Gimmes. Anyone got any insights? And I do mean any insights, whether pertinent to this song or whatever. I’m just short on insights, okay?!? In other words, if you’ve got some insights, and again song-related or otherwise would be just fine, then please send them my way. 

Now STAY here and make sure no one leaves …

I just got verification from Down By Law that this, in fact, is their song.

MxPx:

Toy Dolls:

SPACE

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which cover song prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!? 

 

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “For No One” – The Beatles
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: el Son Cubanos vs. Ian McCulloch vs. Anne Sofie von Otter and Elvis Costello
VOTE, COMMENT, then CURB YOUR DOG
CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com
So Where Are the Strong, And Who Are the Trusted, And Where is the Broccoli, Sweet Broccoli!

So Where Are the Strong,
And Who Are the Trusted,
And Where is the Broccoli, Sweet Broccoli!

 

 

 

 

The Original

 

The Beatles:

 

THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

 

el Son Cubanos vs. Ian McCulloch vs. Anne Sofie von Otter and Elvis Costello
el Son Cubanos:

Ian McCulloch:

Anne Sofie von Otter and Elvis Costello:

SPACE

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which cover song prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!? 

 

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.