Posts Tagged ‘Yo La Tengo’

Pots-Pourris du Jour: “Pink Elephants on Parade / Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah” – (Music from Vintage Disney Films) / “(I’m Not) Your Steppin’ Stone / Hit the Road Jack” – (Paul Revere & The Raiders / Ray Charles) / “Mendocino / Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head” – (Sir Douglas Quartet / Burt Bacharach)
THE CLASH of Cover Medleys: Sun Ra & His Arkestra and Harry Nilsson vs. Johnny Thunders & The Oddballs vs. Yo La Tengo
(With Apologies to Medleyophobics)
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Official Cover Me Impressed Medley Definitions:

 

For our purposes we will rely on medley standards as outlined at the 2012 Institute of Chartered Music Listeners Music-Medley Symposium, which identified and defined the following categories of

Broccoli For Miles And Miles And Miles And Miles And Miles ... Oh Yeah!

Broccoli For Miles
And Miles And Miles
And Miles And Miles …
Oh Yeah!

Music Medleys:

The Meager-Medley – a musical composition comprised of parts from two independent songs.

The Mini-Medley – a musical composition comprised of parts from three independent songs.

The Medial-Medley – a musical composition comprised of parts from four independent songs.

The Mega-Medley – a musical composition comprised of parts from five or more independent songs.

 

THE CLASH of Cover Medleys

 

Sun Ra & His Arkestra and Harry Nilsson vs. Johnny Thunders & The Oddballs vs. Yo La Tengo
Sun Ra & His Arkestra and Harry Nilsson:
“Elephants on Parade” (Disney Films: Dumbo) / “Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah” (Disney Films: Song of the South)

Johnny Thunders & The Oddballs:
“(I’m Not) Your Steppin’ Stone” (Paul Revere & The Raiders) / “Hit the Road Jack” (Ray Chares)

Yo La Tengo:

Beginning in 1996, Yo La Tengo supported the fundraising efforts of New York’s world-renowned independent radio outlet WFMU with annual studio visits. All listeners who pledged money during the band’s appearances were offered the chance to request a favorite song that YLT would then attempt to perform; no rehearsals, no advance word of what the requests might be, just plug it in and kick it out. The spontaneous element is impressive and, at times, hysterical.

“Mendocino” (Sir Douglas Quartet) / “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head” (Burt Bacharach) 

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which medley of cover songs prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!?

 

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “Here Comes My Baby” – Cat Stevens
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: The Smith vs. Bart Davenport with Joe Goldmark & The Seducers vs. Yo La Tengo
VOTE, COMMENT, then ROMP, ROMP, ROMP (UNTIL THEY REVOKE YOUR PAROLE)
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Broc 3 - Cover Me Impressed

Here Comes My Bok Choy, Here She Comes Now …

 

Here Comes My Baby was written by Cat Stevens and appeared on his first album, Matthew and Son, which was released in 1967. Shortly thereafter The Tremeloes released a single of Here Comes My Baby. The Tremeloes’ version was a huge success, reaching No. 13 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Chart and No. 4 in the UK Singles Chart.

 

The Original

 

Cat Stevens:

 

The Most Popular

 

The Tremeloes:

 

THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

 

The Smith vs. Bart Davenport with Joe Goldmark & The Seducers vs. Yo La Tengo
The Smith:

Bart Davenport with Joe Goldmark & The Seducers:

Amoeba Records. Nice!

Yo La Tengo:

SPACE

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which cover song prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!? 

 

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “The Night Chicago Died” – Paper Lace
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes:
Frontier Wives vs. Jaak Joala vs No Empathy vs Yo La Tengo
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Broc 3 - Cover Me Impressed

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny … Cover Me Impressed!

The Night Chicago Died reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in 1974, reached number 3 in the UK charts, and number 2 in Canada. And why not? This assault on one’s sensibilities had everything you’d look for in a 1970’s hit: rudimentary, grade-school level verses, lyrics teeming with sappy emotion, a simple John Wayne good guys always win in the end patriotic mentality, a catchy chorus that stays with you like herpes and some electric guitar licks to enforce just how hip the song and, by extension, its listeners must truly be. Many would argue that The Night Chicago Died is the worst song of all time. However, they’d be wrong. The song’s potential for infamy is limited to possibly being the second worst song of all time as Billy, Don’t Be A Hero currently and mostly likely always will hold the distinction of being the worst the music world has ever produced. Amazingly, both abominations were first recorded by the same band, the all-time abysmal “Paper Lace”.

“Paper Lace” sent a copy of The Night Chicago Died to then Mayor Richard J. Daley who apparently hated it. So at least there is one minute reason to extend a very small modicom of respect to the man.

The Original

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Paper Lace:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Frontier Wives vs. Jaak Joala vs. No Empathy vs. Yo La Tengo

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Frontier Wives:

Okay, these guys’ rendition was included because it looks like they are having a really good time and the raucous audience is definitely enjoying themselves as well.

Jaak Joala:

This guy’s version was included because it is sung in Estonian and any significant change as such to this miserable song is most certainly a welcome relief.

No Empathy:

This version was included because it is forkin’ great and something had to save today’s blog from its own misery.

Yo La Tengo:

Beginning in 1996, Yo La Tengo supported the fundraising efforts of New York’s world-renowned independent radio outlet WFMU with annual studio visits. All listeners who pledged money during the band’s appearances were offered the chance to request a favorite song that Yo La Tengo would then attempt to perform; no rehearsals, no advance word of what the requests might be, just plug it in and kick it out. The spontaneous element is impressive and, at times, hysterical. It is from one of these sessions that Yo La Tengo’s version of The Night Chicago Died was produced.

And so this version was included because … it’s YO LA TENGO so of course it had to be included!!!

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. It is your solemn responsibility to decide which cover song prevails. In other words … Which Side Are You On?!!? 

SPACE

SPACE

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

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Tune du Jour: “Sea Cruise” – Frankie Ford with Huey “Piano” Smith & His Clowns
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: Rico vs. Yo La Tengo
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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You Broke My Will, Oh What A Thrill, Goodness Gracious Great Balls Of Broccoli!

You Broke My Will, Oh What A Thrill, Goodness Gracious Great Balls Of Broccoli!

A real confusing history to this song. Sea Cruise was composed by Huey “Piano” Smith. It was first recorded by Huey “Piano” Smith & His Clowns at Johnny Vincent’s Ace Records in 1959. The lead singer on the original recording was Bobby Marchan. Vincent loved the music but, for reasons that are not entirely clear, decided to ax Marchan from the recording. It may have been that Vincent felt the vocals could be improved upon. It may have been for racial reasons (Marchan was black). Or it may have simply been that Vincent disliked Marchan on a personal level, which is the reason most in the industry seem to believe. Whatever the reason, enter 19 year-old, up-and-coming vocalist Frankie Ford. Vincent cut Marchan’s singing from the recording, added some nautical sounds and over dubbed Frankie Ford on vocals. Sea Cruise, with Frankie Ford on vocals, quickly became a huge success, reaching No. 14 on the US Charts.

Frankie Ford had changed some of the lyrics slightly so he could get songwriter credit. Ultimately, Huey Smith received little-to-no royalties on the song he wrote and composed. In 1971, twelve years after Frankie Ford’s version, the original version of Sea Cruise with Bobby Marchan on vocals was finally released.

The Original Recording

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Huey “Piano” Smith & His Clowns featuring Bobby Marchan on Vocals:

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The First Released Recording

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Frankie Ford with Huey “Piano” Smith & His Clowns:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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Rico vs. Yo La Tengo

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Rico:

Yo La Tengo:

Yo La Tengo is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold yellow!

Yo La Tengo’s triumph in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

10/1/2013 – “Somebody’s Baby” (Jackson Browne) – Yo La Tengo (90%) annihilate The Gamits (10%)

Beginning in 1996, Yo La Tengo supported the fundraising efforts of New York’s world-renowned independent radio outlet, WFMU, with annual studio visits. All listeners who pledged money during the band’s appearances were offered the chance to request a favorite song that Yo La Tengo would then attempt to perform; no rehearsals, no advance word of what the requests might be, just plug it in and kick it out. The spontaneous element is impressive and, at times, hysterical.

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Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to three months from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Runoff du Jour: “The Night Chicago Died” – Paper Lace
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes Runoff: No Empathy vs. Yo La Tengo
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
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Everybody's Dressin' Funny ... Cover Me Impressed!

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny … Cover Me Impressed!

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7-Day results of the competition between No Empathy and Yo La Tengo covering “The Night Chicago Died” by Paper Lace ended in a tie.

However, THERE ARE NO TIES ON COVER ME IMPRESSED!

Hence, a 3-Day runoff to settle the issue. If the runoff should also end in a tie then I’ll be forced to contract a maiming of all musicians concerned (i.e. Paper Lace, No Empathy and Yo La Tengo) and at least one individual totally unrelated to the proceedings (probably Billy Joel), which may seem a bit harsh and arbitrary but, hell, some things just have to be done …

The Original

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Many would argue that The Night Chicago Died is the worst song of all time. However, they’d be wrong. The song’s potential for infamy is limited to possibly being the second worst song of all time as Billy, Don’t Be A Hero currently and mostly likely always will hold the distinction of being the worst the music world has ever produced. Amazingly, both abominations were first recorded by the same band, the all-time abysmal “Paper Lace”.

The Night Chicago Died reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in 1974, reached number 3 in the UK charts, and number 2 in Canada. And why not? This assault on one’s sensibilities had everything you’d look for in a 1970’s hit: rudimentary, grade-school level verses, lyrics teeming with sappy emotion, a simple John Wayne good guys always win in the end patriotic mentality, a catchy chorus that stays with you like herpes and some electric guitar licks to enforce just how hip the song and, by extension, its listeners must truly be.

“Paper Lace” sent a copy of The Night Chicago Died to then Mayor Richard J. Daley who apparently hated it. So at least there is one minute reason to extend a very small modicom of respect to the man.

Paper Lace:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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No Empathy vs. Yo La Tengo

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No Empathy:

Yo La Tengo:

Beginning in 1996, Yo La Tengo supported the fundraising efforts of New York’s world-renowned independent radio outlet WFMU with annual studio visits. All listeners who pledged money during the band’s appearances were offered the chance to request a favorite song that Yo La Tengo would then attempt to perform; no rehearsals, no advance word of what the requests might be, just plug it in and kick it out. The spontaneous element is impressive and, at times, hysterical. It is from one of these sessions that Yo La Tengo’s version of The Night Chicago Died was produced.

Yo La Tengo is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold yellow.

Yo La Tengo’s triumphal performance in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

10/1/2013 – “Somebody’s Baby” (Jackson Browne) – Yo La Tengo (90%) annihilate The Gamits (10%)

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to seven days from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Tune du Jour: “The Night Chicago Died” – Paper Lace
THE CLASH of Cover Tunes: No Empathy vs. Yo La Tengo
Peruse, Comment and Vote (I Beseech, Implore and Urge Thee, respectively)
CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com     CoverMeImpressed.com

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Everybody's Dressin' Funny ... Cover Me Impressed!

Everybody’s Dressin’ Funny … Cover Me Impressed!

Many would argue that The Night Chicago Died is the worst song of all time. However, they’d be wrong. The song’s potential for infamy is limited to possibly being the second worst song of all time as Billy, Don’t Be A Hero currently and mostly likely always will hold the distinction of being the worst the music world has ever produced. Amazingly, both abominations were first recorded by the same band, the all-time abysmal “Paper Lace”.

The Night Chicago Died reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in 1974, reached number 3 in the UK charts, and number 2 in Canada. And why not? This assault on one’s sensibilities had everything you’d look for in a 1970’s hit: rudimentary, grade-school level verses, lyrics teeming with sappy emotion, a simple John Wayne good guys always win in the end patriotic mentality, a catchy chorus that stays with you like herpes and some electric guitar licks to enforce just how hip the song and, by extension, its listeners must truly be.

“Paper Lace” sent a copy of The Night Chicago Died to then Mayor Richard J. Daley who apparently hated it. So at least there is one minute reason to extend a very small modicom of respect to the man.

The Original

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Paper Lace:

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THE CLASH of Cover Tunes

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No Empathy vs. Yo La Tengo

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No Empathy:

Yo La Tengo:

Beginning in 1996, Yo La Tengo supported the fundraising efforts of New York’s world-renowned independent radio outlet WFMU with annual studio visits. All listeners who pledged money during the band’s appearances were offered the chance to request a favorite song that Yo La Tengo would then attempt to perform; no rehearsals, no advance word of what the requests might be, just plug it in and kick it out. The spontaneous element is impressive and, at times, hysterical. It is from one of these sessions that Yo La Tengo’s version of The Night Chicago Died was produced.

Yo La Tengo is a recipient of CMI’s universally coveted title of Uni Victor Melodious Maximus in Adversarial Replication. Among the title’s myriad of rewards and benefits, perhaps most desirous is that it bestows upon the recipient the eminently yearned for privilege of having one’s name appear in print media in bold yellow.

Yo La Tengo’s triumphal performance in CMI’s THE CLASH of Cover Tunes competition is detailed below:

10/1/2013 – “Somebody’s Baby” (Jackson Browne) – Yo La Tengo (90%) annihilate The Gamits (10%)

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

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Votes can be cast up to seven days from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.

Broc 4L

Broccoli Man Abides!

Great Songwriter, Mediocre Song, Great Movie and 2 Great Covers, although, 1 must be better than the other …

The Original

Jackson Browne:

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The Cover Songs Competition

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Both deserving of consideration but, c’mon, is this really a fair fight. I think not.

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The Gamits vs. Yo La Tengo

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The Gamits:

Yo La Tengo:

Oh the disharmony! Much like Harlan County there are no neutrals here. Only one cover tune will live to play another day and it is your solemn responsibility to decide which one prevails. So tell me … Which Side Are You On?!!?

Also, keep in mind that if you should spontaneously self-actualize while playing a cover then you could – and probably should – nominate it for Top 10 (i.e. “Impeccable”) consideration.

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Votes can be cast up to seven days from the day and time of the original post.

Disclaimer: Votes cast from Florida may or may not be counted.